The Renewal and Success of Lied Lodge & Conference Center

Lied Lodge The Renewal and Success of Lied Lodge & Conference Center By James R. Fazio | July 24, 2017 “I have stayed at Lied Lodge a few times for different purposes, always with a group or conference. The ambience is amazing, hospitality is top-notch, food is wonderful, and conference services are the best. Best of all is the dedication to environmental stewardship.” When a guest commented on his experience at Lied Lodge & Conference Center at Arbor Day Farm in Nebraska City, Nebraska, he summed up the goals of the facility, giving staff reason to celebrate. In 1990, this concept was only a dream and some plans on paper. In 1993, the new building was ready for use. By 2015, corporate leadership at Wyndham Vacation Ownership and the Omaha-based Peter Kiewit Foundation recognized the more than 20 years of success and special contributions made by this unique facility and its staff. As a result, and with the added financial support of Arbor Day Foundation members, they sp..
Read More

Ask an Arborist: How do I Choose a Nursery Tree?

Ask An Arborist Ask an Arborist: How do I Choose a Nursery Tree? By Arbor Day Foundation | July 21, 2017 Good tree care starts with a healthy tree. When shopping for trees at a nursery, there are numerous types of trees to choose from. Before buying a tree, there are three factors to consider: tree function, form and size, and site conditions. These factors will help you choose a tree that is appropriate for its planting location. Tree Function When choosing a tree, think about what purpose you would like the tree to serve. Are you adding a tree for beauty? Privacy? Windbreak? Shade? The type of tree you choose will be dependent on how you want it to function. If you’re planting to add beauty, a flowering tree is a great option. Evergreens work best when planting a windbreak or privacy fence and offer year-round color. A large deciduous tree will give shade, keeping your house cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Form and Size Selecting the right form and size of..
Read More

Bota Box Sponsors Arbor Day Foundation’s First Facebook Live Tour

Corporate Partnerships Bota Box Sponsors Arbor Day Foundation’s First Facebook Live Tour By Coe Roberts | July 20, 2017 This is a recap of our April Facebook Live Tour supported by our partners at Bota Box. We are grateful to them for helping to make this trip possible and for their long-term commitment to the trees and forests of our nation. Early Monday morning I headed to the mountains to meet with U.S. Forester Sage Finn at the Manitou Experimental Research Station in Pike/San Isabel National Forest. It was serendipitous that the first stop on our tour was at Pike National Forest, a forest Bota Box is helping plant trees in this year. I admired the sun bouncing off Pikes Peak as I drove down the winding road that led to the research station. If you’re ever in the Colorado Springs area and want to explore attractions other than the popular Garden of the Gods and Pikes Peak excursions, call the Manitou Experimental Research Station and schedule a tour with a forest ra..
Read More

American Holly: A Mystic Icon

Tree of the Week American Holly: A Mystic Icon By James R. Fazio | July 18, 2017 Ilex opaca The American holly tree has been popular since the beginning of American history, having served Natives with wood for different applications and berries that were used for buttons and barter. It was said to be a favorite of George Washington, and more than a dozen hollies he planted are still evident today. The first scientific observation of the American Holly tree was recorded in 1744. Holly sparked spiritual status and a place in traditions dating back to ancient Rome and Saturn, the Sun God. Romans used holly to ward off lightning strikes, and they often included it as a decoration when giving gifts. Druids hallowed the evergreen plant, appreciating its greenness in the drab winter landscape. To them, holly became a hair ornament and outdoor home decoration that offered woodland fairies a place of shelter. Early Christians borrowed the holly traditions when Christmas became e..
Read More

Summer Brings Blazing Forest Fires

Replanting Our National Forests Summer Brings Blazing Forest Fires By Bradley Brandt | July 14, 2017 The aftereffects of wildfires is devastating to wildlife and the natural landscape When fires sweep across forests, the sight of these charred landscapes is devastating. Thousands of trees are burned and hundreds of wildlife species are left without cover. Many animals instinctively flee forests once flames begin, but for many young and small animals, their plan of escape fails, leaving them vulnerable. The effects of wildfire doesn’t end once the flames are extinguished. It is a long path to recovery and we are determined to be a part of it. This year marks the 27th year the Arbor Day Foundation and the U.S. Forest Service have partnered together on forest restoration projects. In 1990, we offered our support and the desire to focus reforestation efforts on urgent, large-scale projects on federal lands. The first project we supported was on Gallatin National Forest, res..
Read More

Los Papales Estate is a Model Farm for Sustainability

Arbor Day Coffee Los Papales Estate is a Model Farm for Sustainability By Jon Ferguson | July 12, 2017 Los Papales has their own cupping room on-site, ensuring customers a rich, smooth tasting coffee every in every cup. Situated high in the mountains of northern Nicaragua is a small town with a reputation for producing some of the best quality coffee in the country. More than half of Nicaragua’s coffee comes from the Jinotega region, also known as the “capital of coffee.” The variety of high-altitudes, forests, valleys, soils, and climate are all factors that contribute to the quality of coffee in the area. Arbor Day coffee buyer Jon Ferguson visited one of the area’s largest coffee producers and learned a lot about the practices behind the operation that make this farm successful. Los Papales Estate is a family-owned farm that manages nearly 200 hectares of coffee fields full of leguminous fruits and hardwood shade tree species. Nearly half of the farm is left as natur..
Read More

American Beech: The Engraved

Tree of the Week American Beech: The Engraved By Sheereen Othman | July 11, 2017 Fagus grandifolia When early settlers would search for fertile land, they looked for American Beech trees, but these trees started disappearing as land was cleared to establish farming for food. The tree was also popular to make water wheels from because of the tree’s resistance to water decay. In hilly locations, passenger pigeons were commonly found perched on branches of the tree. It wasn’t uncommon for limbs to break off because of the weight of so many pigeons. This beauty is more than a rest stop for passenger pigeons. Its dense canopy and smooth silvery-gray colored bark catches the attention of spectators. Beech nuts are an important food source for chipmunks, squirrels, and birds. The wide-spreading canopy provides great shade in the summer and beautiful bronze coloring in the fall. Although slow-growing, it is a versatile tree, often used in parks, golf courses, acreages, and the f..
Read More

American Mountainash: The Witchwood Tree

Tree of the Week American Mountainash: The Witchwood Tree By James R. Fazio | July 4, 2017 Sorbus americana Looking for a shield to cast off witches and malevolence? Travel back to 18th century Europe and residents would tell you to use mountainash wood as a guard to keeping witches away. Old folklore tells stories of people planting mountainash trees near the front of their houses and burning twigs to lay outside their home entrance to ward off evil. Some people went as far as making necklaces of ash wood. So, when colonists first moved to America and discovered American mountainash —cousin to the European mountainash — it was said that “the witches who crossed the ocean with the first colonists were soon exorcised by the very air and the sky of the New World.” The tree was said to bring good luck because of its five-pointed star, or pentagram, on the stalk of each berry. Pentagrams were considered symbols of protection. Although the tree may have been useful to keepin..
Read More

Which Small Trees will Work for your Yard?

Landscape Design Which Small Trees will Work for your Yard? By Sheereen Othman | June 28, 2017 Trees are great landscaping tools to beautifying your yard, creating privacy, and adding color. Numerous factors go into deciding what tree is suitable for your yard. Planting the right tree in the right place is crucial for the health of your trees, and for the safety of nearby structures. There are trees suitable for every landscape, including those with limited space. Check out these small landscape trees that are perfect for adding color in smaller yards. Sargent Crabapple Malus sargentii This compact landscape tree is a spring star, with abundant clusters of fragrant white flowers making their appearance in May. Its dense, spreading crown and zigzagging branches add to the appeal, often making the tree wider than it is tall. Because of its size, the Sargent crabapple is useful for planting under utility lines, in confined yards, as privacy screens and hedges and on slopi..
Read More

Hackberry: One Tough Tree

Tree of the Week Hackberry: One Tough Tree By James R. Fazio | June 27, 2017 Celtis occidentalis The hackberry has appropriately been called, “one tough tree.” Colonists had enough other trees to choose from that they didn’t pay much attention to the hackberry trees. They found them scattered throughout forests rather than in solid stands. The quality of the wood relegated its use mostly to barrel hoops. On the drier plains, it was used along with any other wood that could be obtained for flooring and other parts of the homestead. The first colonists paid it the indignity of calling it ‘hagberry.’ This was either mistaken identity or because they found it similar to the wild cherry species by that name in Scotland. The tree eventually became the ‘hackberry.’ This tree has some unique characteristics. The bark resembles warts on young trees and changes into ridges as the tree matures. Witches’ brooms are also common among hackberry trees. Witches’ broom is a disease where..
Read More