Community Tree Recovery Renews Hope in 2017

Community Tree Recovery Community Tree Recovery Renews Hope in 2017 By Abbie Eisenhart | June 21, 2017 Jerry and Charlotte lived in their house for 39 years and watched as all but one of the trees they had planted and nurtured were destroyed. “I felt sick to my stomach to see no trees. That’s what this town was built on, and that’s what I miss—the trees,” Charlotte told Arbor Day Foundation staff at a tree distribution event. When Hurricane Katrina made landfall in August of 2005, our members asked how the Arbor Day Foundation was planning to help. So many trees were needed to replace those lost in the hurricane, and we worked diligently to help get tens of thousands of those replaced. Those trees led to what the Community Tree Recovery program would become years later, when devastating tornados hit Alabama and Missouri in 2011. Six years later, the Community Tree Recovery program continues to grow and expand. As of today, the program has planted or distributed more tha..
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Yellow Buckeye: A Rugged Beauty

Tree of the Week Yellow Buckeye: A Rugged Beauty By James R. Fazio | June 20, 2017 Aesculus flava (octandra) In 1784 while traveling near the Cheat River — in what is now West Virginia — sharp-eyed George Washington spotted a yellow buckeye with flowers that were purple instead of yellow. He planted seeds of that tree at Mount Vernon where the last one died not long ago. There is something compelling about this tree. It is not graceful like an American elm or a weeping willow, nor charming like a dogwood or redbud. Instead, it has a sort of rugged beauty —massive, a bit unkempt and standing tall and bold in both forest and park. Botanists call its crown “coarse” or “irregular” and its bark thick and “curious.” But they also comment on the bright glow of its showy blooms and the warmth of its fall colors. The yellow buckeye is a delightful sight in the Appalachian Mountains. The striking compound leaves of the buckeye trees provide an accent in both forest and urban sett..
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Ask an Arborist: How do I Know if my Trees Need Water?

Ask An Arborist Tree Care Ask an Arborist: How do I Know if my Trees Need Water? By Arbor Day Foundation | June 16, 2017 Tree watering is a key part of tree care, but it’s difficult to specify how much water trees need. No two trees are alike, and several factors and conditions will impact how much water a tree requires. The age, size, location, climate, soil, and type of tree play a part in how much to water your tree. Younger trees generally require more frequent watering than mature trees because their root system isn’t established, as a result they use more energy establishing a root system and require more water. In the first couple years of your tree’s life it isn’t uncommon to water twice a week. But as the tree matures, how you water it will change. Since roots grow deep, trees prefer a deep watering less often versus watering frequently and only wetting the surface of the soil. That is why drip systems are the preferred method in the industry, because it allows w..
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Bur Oak: Tough Tree for Tough Places

Tree of the Week Bur Oak: Tough Tree for Tough Places By James R. Fazio | June 13, 2017 Quercus macrocarpa Despite its acorns being called “frilled,” there is nothing dainty about the bur oak tree. The frills around its gigantic acorn are wild and woolly, and the top of the cap is corky and tough like the armor of an old-time gladiator. Its bark, too, is rough and dark, and the trunk massive. Landscape architects call its crown “coarse textured” and loggers and woodworkers are attracted to its very hard wood. Pioneers were amazed when they first encountered the “oak openings” of the Midwest. These were like bits of paradise — grassy and ready to farm — and interspersed with bur oaks they could use for shade or good wood. Further west, they found the bur oak standing like giant sentinels where the woodlands finally gave way to the tall grass prairies. Today, we call this ecological edge the ‘savanna’ and know that the bur oaks can grow there because they resist the flames..
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How Much does your Tree Save you?

Misc Trees How Much does your Tree Save you? By Sheereen Othman | June 9, 2017 Measuring the value of your trees Trees do so much for us, they are active members of our communities. Cities across the country save millions of dollars annually from the hard-work of urban trees. Whether it’s cleaning our air, purifying water, shading buildings, or beautifying landscapes, trees have proven to be valuable in community infrastructure. The same could be said about trees in neighborhoods. When we commissioned Wakefield Research to conduct the 2016 NeighborWoods Month Survey, we learned what homeowners think about trees. We discovered that 63 percent of people surveyed would never buy a house that didn’t have trees in the yard. Trees are a deciding factor when buying a new home. In fact, Americans would pay 18 percent more for a house with trees in the yard. Trees are some of the least expensive items you can add to your landscape and immediately earn value back. Landscaping wit..
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The Sawtooth Oak

Tree of the Week The Sawtooth Oak By Sheereen Othman | June 6, 2017 Quercus acutissima Are you looking for a hardy tree that is seldom troubled by pests or disease? The sawtooth oak is a resilient shade tree with a bit of flare. Native to eastern Asia, the sawtooth oak made its first appearance in America in 1862. The tree starts producing acorns at an early age, making it extremely popular with wild turkeys, squirrels, and other wildlife. But it has more to offer than food value. The tree boasts a dense canopy with attractive fall color in shades of yellow and golden brown. It’s easy to grow and maintain and does well in numerous conditions including slight drought. What makes this tree stand out is its serrated, oblong leaves — suggestive of how it earned its common name. In the Landscape The sawtooth oak is a large tree, reaching up to 60 feet in urban settings. It’s fast growing and yields huge quantities of 1-inch acorns in the fall. It does best in full sun and ..
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Celebrate Great Outdoors and Water Month in one of These Forests

National Forests Replanting Our National Forests Celebrate Great Outdoors and Water Month in one of These Forests By Sheereen Othman | June 1, 2017 June marks two national celebrations: National Great Outdoors Month AND National Rivers and Water Month. Great Outdoors Month is an initiative designed to get people active outdoors. The timing couldn’t be better as it’s the start of summer and end of the school year, what better way to mark the occasion than playing in the sun? National Rivers and Water Month is also set in June. It’s a time to pause and reflect on all that clean rivers and streams do for us. More than 180 million Americans depend on watersheds including rivers for their drinking water. We know the importance of a healthy forest to provide clean water. Read From Forest to Faucet – the importance of trees in helping to keep your drinking water safe and clean When watersheds are damaged or impaired, it doesn’t only affect wildlife in the forest that depend on ..
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Northern Red Oak: A Tree of Ease

Tree of the Week Northern Red Oak: A Tree of Ease By Sheereen Othman | May 30, 2017 Quercus rubra The northern red oak has been called “one of the handsomest, cleanest, and stateliest trees in North America” by naturalist Joseph S. Illick. During the colonial times people realized that red oaks are of high value and have superior wood qualities. This Midwest native quickly became a favorite for landscapers because of the tree’s adaptability and usefulness, including its hardiness in urban settings. In addition to its strength, the tree is attractive, displaying a beautiful show of reds and browns in the fall. One of the many distinctive features of the northern red oak is that it is easier than most oaks to transplant. It is believed that the first red oak to be transplanted was in Bishop Compton’s garden in England. It is equally at home on a shady city street or as part of a natural or managed forest. By 1924, there were more than 450 acres of red oak plantations in Ba..
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Tree Campus USA Keeps Students Involved

Tree Campus USA Tree Campus USA Keeps Students Involved By Amber Filipi | May 25, 2017 Since 2008, the Tree Campus USA program has recognized college and university campuses that effectively manage campus trees, develop connectivity with the community beyond campus borders to foster healthy, urban forests, engage student population through service learning opportunities centered on campus, and community forestry efforts. In 2016, more than 300 colleges met the program’s five standards and were recognized as a Tree Campus USA. Lone Star College-Montgomery received the distinction in 2016 and shares some of the wonderful forestry work the campus has focused on below. From the beginning, Lone Star College-Montgomery has known the value of trees on our campus. Located just north of The Woodlands, Texas, students and visitors enjoy our “paradise behind the pines” wooded grounds. Our campus has a reputation for its beautiful setting, largely provided by trees. Lone Star Co..
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Pin Oak: Autumn Glory

Tree of the Week Pin Oak: Autumn Glory By Sheereen Othman | May 23, 2017 Quercus palustris The pin oak pleases me for reasons I cannot wholly explain. — Hal Borland, A Countryman’s Woods The pin oak is the type of tree that stands out from its neighbors. Pin oak is not the largest of forest trees, but its distinctive branching pattern sets it apart from other oaks. The pin oak has a single, central trunk that rises from the ground to the tip of the tree. Upper branches are upright, middle ones horizontal and its lower limbs slant gracefully toward the ground. Its Latin name palustris means “of the swamp,” a reference to the tree’s ability to thrive in heavy soils on moist bottomlands. In the wild, the lower branches of the tree are often shaded by other trees, eventually splitting from its crown and leaving pin-like stubs. The pin oak has also become a popular street and park tree. interestingly, the same traits that led to its popularity have the potential to lead to..
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