The Living Urn: Helping Families Grieve and Grow Tree Memorials for Loved Ones

Corporate Partnerships The Living Urn: Helping Families Grieve and Grow Tree Memorials for Loved Ones By Arbor Day Foundation | October 13, 2017 Guest post by Mike Wallace, The Living Urn® . The practice of planting trees in memory of the deceased dates back thousands of years and is common in many cultures. At The Living Urn® , we wanted to take this beautiful practice a step further. We wanted to make a difference in the lives of others while at the same time giving back to nature. We thought, what if we could plant trees with the cremated remains of a loved one. After spending years working with leading soil scientists and arborists and multiple eco-friendly manufacturers, we were ready to introduce The Living Urn® . The Living Urn® is a patent pending bio urn and planting system designed to grow a healthy and enduring memory tree from our proprietary BioUrn® using cremated remains. Our planting systems are made from recycled plant materials and produced only by ..
Read More

Red Maple: Sunset in the Forest

Tree of the Week Red Maple: Sunset in the Forest By James R. Fazio | October 10, 2017 Acer rubrum Red. The color of passion — and the extremes that go with it. It is love on the one hand and danger, warning, or even hate on the other. In the psychology of colors, red has a lot of meanings, but mediocrity is never one of them. Red is not a color to be ignored. How appropriate for a species like red maple. Here is a tree of great beauty and extremes. It is a tree loved by many but despised by some. It offers a year ‘round highlight in home landscaping but is an aggressive tree in the forest that some people think is crowding out species of greater value. The Red Maple has a lot of claims to fame, including the greatest north-south range of any tree species living entirely in the eastern forests. (Newfoundland to southern Florida). It is also the state tree of Rhode Island. No one seems to know the whole story of why it was selected by the citizens of this smallest of stat..
Read More

Japanese Red Maple: An Autumn Staple

Tree of the Week Japanese Red Maple: An Autumn Staple By James R. Fazio | October 3, 2017 Acer palmatum var. atropurpureum When Swedish doctor-botanist Carl Thunberg was privileged to travel to Japan late in the eighteenth century, he secreted out drawings of a small tree that would eventually become synonymous with the high art of oriental gardens. The first specimen of the tree arrived in England in 1820 and was named Acer palmatum after the hand-like shape of its leaves. This would hardly surprise the Japanese who for centuries referred to their group of maples as kaede and momiji, references to the ‘hands’ of frogs and babies, respectively. For centuries, Japanese horticulturalists have developed cultivars of the maples found in their country and nearby Korea and China. Today, there are hundreds on the market, and Acer palmatum ‘Atropurpureum’ (meaning “dark-purple”) is one of the most popular. Of all its close kin, this Japanese red maple is not only a sensation be..
Read More

Top 5 Evergreens Sold through the Arbor Day Tree Nursery

Tree Planting Top 5 Evergreens Sold through the Arbor Day Tree Nursery By Sheereen Othman | September 28, 2017 Evergreen trees offer numerous benefits when strategically planted around your home. They provide year-round color in the winter when other trees are bare. Additionally, evergreens can be used as a living snow fence, keeping cold winds out which results in lower energy costs. Here are the top 5 evergreen trees sold through the Arbor Day Tree Nursery. Watch Ask an Arborist: Why Should I Plant Evergreens? Green Giant Arborvitae (Thuja standishii x plicata ‘Green Giant‘) The green giant arborvitae is a large, vigorous, fast-growing evergreen—shooting up by as much as 3′ per year until maturity. Its natural pyramidal to conical form boasts dense, rich green foliage that darkens or bronzes slightly in the winter. This is an exceptional landscape tree for use as a screen, hedge or single specimen. It is also resistant to wind once established and can withstand heav..
Read More

Visiting the Birthplace of Coffee: Jimma, Ethiopia

Arbor Day Coffee Visiting the Birthplace of Coffee: Jimma, Ethiopia By Jon Ferguson | September 27, 2017 Have you heard the story of Kaldi the goat herder and his frolicking herd? The famous Ethiopian legend tells the story of Kaldi who noticed how excited his sheep became after eating fruit from a certain tree. Curious, Kaldi tried the fruit. Soon he was bursting with energy. After watching the odd behavior of Kaldi and his herd, a monk took some of this strange cherry fruit back to his monastery where monks spent the night awake and alert. Kaldi is often credited as the first person to discover coffee. Second only to oil, coffee is the most valuable legally traded commodity in the world. People pay top dollar for quality coffee beans. Part of what makes a good coffee bean depends largely on how it is grown and harvested. Coffee buyers have lofty expectations for Ethiopian coffee, after all, the country has been harvesting coffee for centuries. Harvesting Coffee in Sout..
Read More

Lacebark Elm: Tree of the Future

Tree of the Week Lacebark Elm: Tree of the Future By James R. Fazio | September 26, 2017 Ulmus parvifolia Lacebark elm is a lot like a talented actor waiting as an understudy in the wings of the theater to replace a star. In this case, other elm species have been the stars and lacebark is waiting to be ‘discovered.’ It has already been found by many to be a tree worth planting. For example, it is used widely on the grounds of Disney World and in February 2006 the Colorado Tree Coalition named it “Tree of the Month.” Horticulturist Michael Dirr calls it “a tree of the future.” Why all the enthusiasm? It is because lacebark elm has a combination of characteristics that can help fill a gap as our beloved American elms and other native elms succumb to Dutch Elm Disease. It can also stand in where the widely-planted and troublesome Siberian elm needs to be replaced. Lacebark elm is tall, graceful and shady with a beautiful bark pattern that more closely resembles sycamore o..
Read More

Arbor Day Member Story: Pamela Chaiet

Arbor Day Member Stories Arbor Day Member Story: Pamela Chaiet By Arbor Day Foundation | September 25, 2017 A Member’s Contribution Reflects Her Love and Connection with Trees We are responsible for the future. And we are all citizens of the Earth. To live out that commitment I take great pride in supporting the Arbor Day Foundation and its mission of inspiring people to plant, nurture, and celebrate trees. Meet Pamela. A writer, compassionate human being, and supporter of causes. This sense of mission and of giving back is a driving force in the life of Pamela Chaiet of Reston, Virginia. Pamela says it’s a love of trees and all of the natural world that underlies her vision of a better future. “What the Arbor Day Foundation has accomplished in spreading the love and sense of caring for trees is remarkable,” she says, “and I want to further the work of the Foundation for future generations.” “Trees are vital to us all,” she adds. “They give beauty, poetry, and so much m..
Read More

The Chance of a Lifetime

Misc Trees The Chance of a Lifetime By Arbor Day Foundation | September 22, 2017 Floods Destroy Family Farm and Leave Something Unexpected Guest post by John Grassy, Montana Department of Natural Resources Connie and Dick Iversen stood on the high bluff, watching and wondering when it might end. It was June 2011. The Missouri River below them reached a record-high flooding. For the fifth time since its construction in the 1930s, the massive spillway on the Fort Peck Dam was open and gushing water. In the flood of 1975, a record 35,000 cubic feet per second (CFS) of water poured from the dam; in June 2011, the flow exceeded 100,000 CFS at the Culbertson gauging station. Below the bluff, 1,500 acres of the Iversen’s farm near Culbertson drowned under water. Their crops for that year were gone. Four hundred acres of sugar beets, 600 acres of malt barley, and 400 acres of grazing land, gone. The ranch road, the fencing, a center pivot and irrigation system – even an old ho..
Read More

Top 5 Nut Trees Sold Through Arbor Day Tree Nursery

Tree of the Week Top 5 Nut Trees Sold Through Arbor Day Tree Nursery By Sheereen Othman | September 21, 2017 Are you considering adding nut trees or bushes to your yard? The secret to growing high-yielding nut trees is selecting the right tree for your hardiness zone and properly caring for it. Climate and soil play a key role in how much nuts a tree will produce. Proper pruning can also help nut trees bear more fruit. Here are the top 5 nut trees sold through the Arbor Day Tree Nursery. American Hazelnut (Corylus Americana) hardiness zones 4-9 The American hazelnut (also known as the American filbert) is a native shrub of the eastern United States. The tasty nuts are highly prized by cooks for their easy-to-crack shells and small, sweet kernel. Squirrels love them as well … most likely for the same reasons. Hazelnut hedges can be used as windbreaks, visual screens, and to attract wildlife. If you’re interested in planting hazelnuts for their nuts, be sure you have a b..
Read More

Top 5 Nut Trees Sold Through the Arbor Day Tree Nursery

Featured Tree Planting Top 5 Nut Trees Sold Through the Arbor Day Tree Nursery By Sheereen Othman | September 21, 2017 Are you considering adding nut trees or bushes to your yard? The secret to growing high-yielding nut trees is selecting the right tree for your hardiness zone and properly caring for it. Climate and soil play a key role in how much nuts a tree will produce. Proper pruning can also help nut trees bear more fruit. Here are the top 5 nut trees sold through the Arbor Day Tree Nursery. American Hazelnut (Corylus Americana) hardiness zones 4-9 The American hazelnut (also known as the American filbert) is a native shrub of the eastern United States. The tasty nuts are highly prized by cooks for their easy-to-crack shells and small, sweet kernel. Squirrels love them as well … most likely for the same reasons. Hazelnut hedges can be used as windbreaks, visual screens, and to attract wildlife. If you’re interested in planting hazelnuts for their nuts, be sure yo..
Read More