Garden Year 2018: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

Well, what with the recent screeching turn in the weather, it’s beginning to feel like the 2018 gardening season is wrapping up. Moreover, I just spent a few days organizing my photos from the year, which reminded me of all I saw, did, and didn’t do. Therefore, seems to me it’s as good a time as any to review Garden Year 2018. Things that Made Me Whoop Removal of perfectly attractive, incredibly healthy evergreen barberries. There are only so many times your hands can be pierced by 2-3” barbs the likes of hypodermic needles before something drastic has to happen. Whirlwinding through Plant Delights Nursery, Duke Gardens, NC Arboretum, JC Raulston, and the Biltmore in the face of a hurricane. Great horticulture, and good food and drink too. Tours of Chicago gardens before that. Of nurseries and gardens in Delaware since. Good year for seeing cool things. Further infatuation with pollinators, and more and more even other insects. Monarda. Never really paid much attention to them bef..
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Not bothering with clean-up, either; I’m too busy planting

These Narcissus jonquilla var. henriquesii Twinkling Yellow are my new favorites among the miniatures. The last shipment of bulbs has finally arrived and I made a Halloween resolution to lie about my zone when I order next year. It’s not that I think it’s too late to plant them; it’s just a little more pleasant to plant in warmer temps. John Scheepers and Brent & Becky’s think I should plant in November; I’d rather plant in October. It’s that simple. They might be right, but it really doesn’t matter. Bulbs are easy and most of the things people think must or must not be done with them are nonissues. Like: -Fertilization. Never use it, ever. I do throw compost over them, but that’s only because I probably didn’t plant them deep enough and it’s easier to build up than dig down. Unless soil testing has demonstrated a lack, why bother with stinky bone meal? -Timing. Best to plant when you get them, but if you can get a shovel in, plant them then. It’s never too late, right through midwin..
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Not bothering with clean-up, either; I’m too busy planting  by  Elizabeth Licata

These Narcissus jonquilla var. henriquesii Twinkling Yellow are my new favorites among the miniatures. The last shipment of bulbs has finally arrived and I made a Halloween resolution to lie about my zone when I order next year. It’s not that I think it’s too late to plant them; it’s just a little more pleasant to plant in warmer temps. John Scheepers and Brent & Becky’s think I should plant in November; I’d rather plant in October. It’s that simple. They might be right, but it really doesn’t matter. Bulbs are easy and most of the things people think must or must not be done with them are nonissues. Like: -Fertilization. Never use it, ever. I do throw compost over them, but that’s only because I probably didn’t plant them deep enough and it’s easier to build up than dig down. Unless soil testing has demonstrated a lack, why bother with stinky bone meal? -Timing. Best to plant when you get them, but if you can get a shovel in, plant them then. It’s never too late, right through midwin..
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Ask an Arborist: Why Should I Plant in the Fall?

Ask An Arborist Tree Planting Ask an Arborist: Why Should I Plant in the Fall? By Pete Smith | November 1, 2018 One of the most common misconceptions of fall planting is that it is too cold to plant in the late fall. In reality, fall planting is preferred in many areas because it gives seedlings more time to establish their root systems and acclimate to the warm weather in the spring and summer. Because trees go dormant in the winter, they require little to no care. At the Arbor Day Foundation, we intentionally wait until after the first frost before shipping out our trees during the fall season. This ensures the trees are dormant when they arrive. Although it is cold outside, trees can be planted until the ground is frozen solid. If you’re able to stick a spade in the ground, you’re still able to plant your trees. Pro Tip: to make it easier to plant in the fall, pre-dig your holes before your trees arrive and store the soil from the holes in a garage or tool shed to pre..
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