Community Greening Visits Friends of the Urban Forest and Sacramento Tree Foundation

Urban and Community Forestry/Green Infrastructure Community Greening Visits Friends of the Urban Forest and Sacramento Tree Foundation By Matt Spitsen | October 30, 2018 This year, Alliance for Community Trees hosted a mentor exchange program for members through a grant from the U.S. Forest Service. The mentor exchange program paired smaller non-profit groups with larger groups and allowed them to learn by travelling to their location and doing a site visit. Guest post by Mark Cassini & Matt Shipley, co-founders of Community Greening. Flying from South Florida to tour established urban forestry operations in California felt like time travel into the future. Thanks to the mentor exchange, we immersed ourselves in the day-to-day operations of Friends of the Urban Forest and Sacramento Tree Foundation and visited with California ReLeaf. This was our opportunity to learn from decades of experience, diverse staff responsibilities, developed programming, healthy partnerships a..
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Autumn inspires a rash of whackadoodle…

Fall brings on the urge to clean up, but reconsider! I was reporting for jury duty, feeling anonymous in a pool of fellow citizens, when the court officer asked me how far back she could prune her landscape roses this fall. I sighed, and as everyone craned their necks to see whom she had addressed, I told her as much as she likes…but not now. Maybe in March. The calls about pruning start every autumn with the first breath of cold air. I should probably make a recording to save my own hot air, as I feel compelled to explain at length the many reasons that you should not prune in fall. Autumn pruning can have several negative consequences. Done too early in fall, fluctuating temperatures and rain may induce the pruned plant to initiate a flush of growth. This tender new foliage will be singed badly by the first cold snap, so you wasted the plant’s energy stored for next spring’s flush.The cut stems will not heal through the winter, leaving the plant open to dessication, or even infesta..
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Autumn inspires a rash of whackadoodle…  by  Carol Reese

Fall brings on the urge to clean up, but reconsider! I was reporting for jury duty, feeling anonymous in a pool of fellow citizens, when the court officer asked me how far back she could prune her landscape roses this fall. I sighed, and as everyone craned their necks to see whom she had addressed, I told her as much as she likes…but not now. Maybe in March. The calls about pruning start every autumn with the first breath of cold air. I should probably make a recording to save my own hot air, as I feel compelled to explain at length the many reasons that you should not prune in fall. Autumn pruning can have several negative consequences. Done too early in fall, fluctuating temperatures and rain may induce the pruned plant to initiate a flush of growth. This tender new foliage will be singed badly by the first cold snap, so you wasted the plant’s energy stored for next spring’s flush.The cut stems will not heal through the winter, leaving the plant open to dessication, or even infesta..
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What Should a Gardener Drink?

Guest Post by Linda Larson One of my favorite BBC shows is “As Time Goes By” with Judi Dench and Geoffrey Palmer playing Jean and Lionel. In the show, many a dilemma is smoothed over with the quintessential British option of a Gin & Tonic. I notice that bit because my cocktail of choice is a G & T. After all, what else should a gardener drink? Gin is infused with botanicals such as juniper berries, lemon peel, almonds, cucumber, chamomile, angelica root, apple, coriander, leaves, fruits, and flowers; it is a liquid combination of the garden. I’ve been traveling in England for a few weeks and I was surprised to discover that gin is having its moment of fame all over the cocktail- and retail-scape of the country. How else can you explain the varieties of gins for sale in the market? Take a look at these flavors: I didn’t know rhubarb was so popular in England. It’s in nearly every garden, there are special growing techniques, and it shows up in many a sweetened cake at tea time, but ..
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What Should a Gardener Drink?  by  Garden Rant

Guest Post by Linda Larson One of my favorite BBC shows is “As Time Goes By” with Judi Dench and Geoffrey Palmer playing Jean and Lionel. In the show, many a dilemma is smoothed over with the quintessential British option of a Gin & Tonic. I notice that bit because my cocktail of choice is a G & T. After all, what else should a gardener drink? Gin is infused with botanicals such as juniper berries, lemon peel, almonds, cucumber, chamomile, angelica root, apple, coriander, leaves, fruits, and flowers; it is a liquid combination of the garden. I’ve been traveling in England for a few weeks and I was surprised to discover that gin is having its moment of fame all over the cocktail- and retail-scape of the country. How else can you explain the varieties of gins for sale in the market? Take a look at these flavors: I didn’t know rhubarb was so popular in England. It’s in nearly every garden, there are special growing techniques, and it shows up in many a sweetened cake at tea time, but ..
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Trees Forever Inspired to Start Youth Watering Program Modeled After Keep Indianapolis Beautiful

Urban and Community Forestry/Green Infrastructure Trees Forever Inspired to Start Youth Watering Program Modeled After Keep Indianapolis Beautiful By Matt Spitsen | October 24, 2018 This year, Alliance for Community Trees hosted a mentor exchange program for members through a grant from the U.S. Forest Service. The mentor exchange program paired smaller non-profit groups with larger groups and allowed them to learn by travelling to their location and doing a site visit. Guest post by Leslie Berckes, program manager and field coordinator, Trees Forever The 2016 Alliance for Community Trees Day in Indianapolis was inspiring to Trees Forever. After attending, we were determined to start a youth watering program modeled after Keep Indianapolis Beautiful’s (KIB) Youth Tree Team – a tree care and youth employment program. The idea kept percolating and when the opportunity opened to take part in Alliance for Community Trees’ mentor exchange program, we threw our hat in the ring..
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The Spotted Lanternfly is No Hoax

John Prine. Photo: Oh Boy Records. The singer-songwriter John Prine doesn’t have anything to do with the hungry spotted lanternfly, but bear with me. Spotted lanternfly is not a hoax. Unless you are a “fact-resistant human,” you should be scared. These border crossers are bad. John Prine, on the other hand, has some thoughts on the Tree of Forgiveness that I’ll get to in a minute. The planet needs redemption, and I’ve found comfort in one of his songs. I first heard of the Asian spotted lanternfly a month ago. It hasn’t arrived yet in Kentucky, but it has begun invading portions of the east coast. Lloyd Traven of Kintersville, PA, co-owner, with his wife, Candy, of the innovative Peace Tree Farm, posted on Facebook a few weeks ago: “Took a 6 mile kayak paddle with Candy, on the lake. All these little floaty things started showing up, little dots on the water. Fucking lanternfly!!!!!” Spotted lanternfly is not a one-stop shopping tree killer like the emerald ash borer that kills ash ..
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The Spotted Lanternfly is No Hoax  by  Allen Bush

John Prine. Photo: Oh Boy Records. The singer-songwriter John Prine doesn’t have anything to do with the hungry spotted lanternfly, but bear with me. Spotted lanternfly is not a hoax. Unless you are a “fact-resistant human,” you should be scared. These border crossers are bad. John Prine, on the other hand, has some thoughts on the Tree of Forgiveness that I’ll get to in a minute. The planet needs redemption, and I’ve found comfort in one of his songs. I first heard of the Asian spotted lanternfly a month ago. It hasn’t arrived yet in Kentucky, but it has begun invading portions of the east coast. Lloyd Traven of Kintersville, PA, co-owner, with his wife, Candy, of the innovative Peace Tree Farm, posted on Facebook a few weeks ago: “Took a 6 mile kayak paddle with Candy, on the lake. All these little floaty things started showing up, little dots on the water. Fucking lanternfly!!!!!” Spotted lanternfly is not a one-stop shopping tree killer like the emerald ash borer that kills ash ..
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Hospitals find ways to create interior gardens

Remedy, by Joan Linder, located in Roswell Park Cancer Institute Can beautiful images of nature promote healing? Even healing from cancer? There is a British university study that suggest the viewing of beautiful art has a powerful effect on the brain’s “joy response” centers. Then there is the landmark 1984 study in which patients recuperated from surgery faster when they saw trees from their window. And recently, sixty percent of Cleveland Clinic patients reported a reduction from stress as a result of their interactions with the institution’s collection of contemporary art. Enough evidence—though not without caveats and some mixed results—has been presented on this that for decades now, hospitals have been bringing art into the mix, with targeted, curated programs that go further than slapping decoration on the walls. Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo is one of those hospitals, with an art program that reaches the patients there in a few different ways. Patients can choose a..
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Hospitals find ways to create interior gardens  by  Elizabeth Licata

Remedy, by Joan Linder, located in Roswell Park Cancer Institute Can beautiful images of nature promote healing? Even healing from cancer? There is a British university study that suggest the viewing of beautiful art has a powerful effect on the brain’s “joy response” centers. Then there is the landmark 1984 study in which patients recuperated from surgery faster when they saw trees from their window. And recently, sixty percent of Cleveland Clinic patients reported a reduction from stress as a result of their interactions with the institution’s collection of contemporary art. Enough evidence—though not without caveats and some mixed results—has been presented on this that for decades now, hospitals have been bringing art into the mix, with targeted, curated programs that go further than slapping decoration on the walls. Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo is one of those hospitals, with an art program that reaches the patients there in a few different ways. Patients can choose a..
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