Conspicuous Consumption

I was raised as a careful Yankee — my father’s people were from small town and rural New England. I turn off the lights as I leave a room; take 3 minute, economical showers; and start my garden plants from seed. Yet I inherited very different impulses from my mother’s side of the family. In particular, I spent a lot of my boyhood relishing the flamboyance of my maternal grandfather, a Western mining engineer who drove a sparkly gold Cadillac the size of a spaceship, loved any excuse for giving presents, and settled backyard disputes with the wildlife with a single, precisely placed bullet. This dichotomy is why I so love this time of year. By now, my garden is full of the vegetable crops I started from seed in my basement in the Spring. I’ve got rows and rows of beans and beets, leeks, sprawls of squashes, lavender and nasturtiums, herbs, and side-by-side patches of basil and tomatoes. Except for the tomatoes, which I ordered as grafted seedlings because they perform better in my ver..
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Conspicuous Consumption  by  Thomas Christopher

I was raised as a careful Yankee — my father’s people were from small town and rural New England. I turn off the lights as I leave a room; take 3 minute, economical showers; and start my garden plants from seed. Yet I inherited very different impulses from my mother’s side of the family. In particular, I spent a lot of my boyhood relishing the flamboyance of my maternal grandfather, a Western mining engineer who drove a sparkly gold Cadillac the size of a spaceship, loved any excuse for giving presents, and settled backyard disputes with the wildlife with a single, precisely placed bullet. This dichotomy is why I so love this time of year. By now, my garden is full of the vegetable crops I started from seed in my basement in the Spring. I’ve got rows and rows of beans and beets, leeks, sprawls of squashes, lavender and nasturtiums, herbs, and side-by-side patches of basil and tomatoes. Except for the tomatoes, which I ordered as grafted seedlings because they perform better in my ver..
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Fewer and even more appreciated: late season wonders  by  Elizabeth Licata

My potted salvia would like to take over the world. I do not have the greatest of September gardens. My urban space is more calibrated to midsummer, the time of Garden Walk, lilies, and many flowering perennials. I also love my garden in spring, when it’s taken over by tulips and other bulbs. But by this point in the season, I’ve grown weary of watering, staking, and deadheading and beginning to appreciate the break that winter provides. That’s not to say that this time of year doesn’t provide its own lush beauty. Colocasia have grown and multiplied to provide immense sculptural canopies. Coleus are equally explosive, dwarfing their unseen pots. While some flowering annuals have given up the ghost, this is definitely salvia’s time. And, of course, a number of midsummer perennials are still providing blooms. Just one on David Austin ‘Charlotte’ Do I regret not planting Knock Outs instead of roses like this David Austin that is currently featuring one, gorgeous, fragrant bloom? I do no..
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