Alternative Lawn for the Northeast  by  Thomas Christopher

My wife – who is the mower of lawns in our partnership – has taken to mowing around any wildflowers she encounters. As a result, our rather sparse fescue lawn has sprouted tufts of black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta), yarrow (Achillea miilefolium), mullein (Verbascum thapsus), maiden pinks (Dianthus deltoides), oxeye daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare) and, in the shady areas, Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum biflorum). I am aware, by the way, that most of these are not true natives, but all are so long naturalized in our fields that they have thoroughly integrated into the local ecology and provide benefits to pollinators and other wildlife. Back-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta) I’m not sure how I feel about the present look of this selective mowing, but I applaud the impulse. I want to transform our lawn but don’t know exactly how. It’s too big a space (3/4’s of an acre) to convert it all to groundcovers and flowering plants. The labor of weeding and maintaining that would be far too much. I co..
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Alternative Lawn for the Northeast

My wife – who is the mower of lawns in our partnership – has taken to mowing around any wildflowers she encounters. As a result, our rather sparse fescue lawn has sprouted tufts of black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta), yarrow (Achillea…Alternative Lawn for the Northeast originally appeared on Garden Rant on July 2, 2018.
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