Perennial Fun in Raleigh This Summer  by  Allen Bush

I love the Perennial Plant Association’s (PPA) summer meetings. I’ve only missed a handful over thirty-five year. The PPA will meet this summer in Raleigh, NC from July 30th—August 3rd. Fergus Garret, Head Gardener at Great Dixter will be a keynote speaker. He’s good. If you don’t believe me, read what Susan Harris wrote about Fergus, after hearing him in Baltimore a few weeks ago. Other speakers (20 +) include garden designer Richard Hartlage; Ron Gagliardo, Sr. Manager of Horticulture Services for Amazon; iris breeder Kevin Vaughn; Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery; Larry Mellichamp, retired Professor of Botany & Horticulture & former Director of the Botanical Gardens at UNC-Charlotte; Christian Kress, founder of Sarastro-Stauden Nursery in Austria; George Coombs, Mt. Cuba Center; Anne Spafford, Assoc. Professor of Landscape Design at NC State Univ.; and Annabel Renwick, Sarah P. Duke Gardens. The tours include some hot spots I always enjoy visiting, including Tony Avent’..
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Perennial Fun in Raleigh This Summer

I love the Perennial Plant Association’s (PPA) summer meetings. I’ve only missed a handful over thirty-five year. The PPA will meet this summer in Raleigh, NC from July 30th—August 3rd. Fergus Garret, Head Gardener at Great Dixter will be a keynote speaker. He’s good. If you don’t believe me, read what Susan Harris wrote about Fergus, after hearing him in Baltimore a few weeks ago. Other speakers (20 +) include garden designer Richard Hartlage; Ron Gagliardo, Sr. Manager of Horticulture Services for Amazon; iris breeder Kevin Vaughn; Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery; Larry Mellichamp, retired Professor of Botany & Horticulture & former Director of the Botanical Gardens at UNC-Charlotte; Christian Kress, founder of Sarastro-Stauden Nursery in Austria; George Coombs, Mt. Cuba Center; Anne Spafford, Assoc. Professor of Landscape Design at NC State Univ.; and Annabel Renwick, Sarah P. Duke Gardens. The tours include some hot spots I always enjoy visiting, including Tony Avent’..
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Obama in the Garden  by  Susan Harris

Just when I thought I couldn’t miss Obama any more than I do, I see this shot of him looking soooo happy to be in the Rose Garden on a beautiful day. Here’s the other favorite shot of White House photographer Pete Souza showing Obama in his garden. Sigh. Source – CBS News Obama in the Garden originally appeared on Garden Rant on May 14, 2018.
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Obama in the Garden

Just when I thought I couldn’t miss Obama any more than I do, I see this shot of him looking soooo happy to be in the Rose Garden on a beautiful day. Here’s the other favorite shot of White House photographer Pete Souza showing Obama in his garden. Sigh. Source – CBS News Obama in the Garden originally appeared on Garden Rant on May 14, 2018.
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Gardening For Health!  by  Scott Beuerlein

I remember a day in April of 2003. It was one of those mythic, glorious spring days that sporadically show up between late freezes and tornadoes here in Ohio. And it was one to behold. Perfect. Most importantly, it was the first of such days that year. Truly “the first nice day of spring.” It was the kind of day that gets every gardener outside gardening, and I decided to cut down a rank silver maple in the backyard so I could plant something better, or, as the case is with silver maples, so I could plant anything. Safety glasses and hearing protection on, and I’m quickly in my own little succession of tasks and intermittent random thoughts as I merrily progressed through the job. The ground was soon a “pickup sticks” mess of brush and logs. I remember sorting my way across this morass. I was happy. Happy to be outside. Happy to be outside on this glorious spring day. Working in the sun. Working in the sun with a chainsaw. Making progress on my yard. Making a better garden. I remember..
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Gardening For Health!

I remember a day in April of 2003. It was one of those mythic, glorious spring days that sporadically show up between late freezes and tornadoes here in Ohio. And it was one to behold. Perfect. Most importantly, it was the first of such days that year. Truly “the first nice day of spring.” It was the kind of day that gets every gardener outside gardening, and I decided to cut down a rank silver maple in the backyard so I could plant something better, or, as the case is with silver maples, so I could plant anything. Safety glasses and hearing protection on, and I’m quickly in my own little succession of tasks and intermittent random thoughts as I merrily progressed through the job. The ground was soon a “pickup sticks” mess of brush and logs. I remember sorting my way across this morass. I was happy. Happy to be outside. Happy to be outside on this glorious spring day. Working in the sun. Working in the sun with a chainsaw. Making progress on my yard. Making a better garden. I remember..
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Lawn culture is the problem, not lawns  by  Elizabeth Licata

And lawn culture is still very much an issue. My front “yard;” a lawn would never thrive here, even if I wanted one. Later, shade perennials will fill it in. Otherwise, why would garden centers still be selling so much weed ‘n’ feed? I know from online discussions I see regularly, with gardening a hot Facebook topic every spring and summer here, that people still have lawns and don’t feel at all guilty about having them. What they feel guilty about is that their lawns are not perfectly emerald green and weed-free. Why else would they be asking about how to get rid of clover and other “invaders?” Otherwise, why would I be able to drive through neighborhoods—not just the suburbs either—and see green spaces dotted with multiple yellow warning signs that indicate recent chemical applications? Otherwise, why would I be able to google any combination of “weed” and “lawn” and find page after page of search results, most absolutely guilt-free about offering the perfect bag of lawn treatment..
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Lawn culture is the problem, not lawns

And lawn culture is still very much an issue. My front “yard;” a lawn would never thrive here, even if I wanted one. Later, shade perennials will fill it in. Otherwise, why would garden centers still be selling so much weed ‘n’ feed? I know from online discussions I see regularly, with gardening a hot Facebook topic every spring and summer here, that people still have lawns and don’t feel at all guilty about having them. What they feel guilty about is that their lawns are not perfectly emerald green and weed-free. Why else would they be asking about how to get rid of clover and other “invaders?” Otherwise, why would I be able to drive through neighborhoods—not just the suburbs either—and see green spaces dotted with multiple yellow warning signs that indicate recent chemical applications? Otherwise, why would I be able to google any combination of “weed” and “lawn” and find page after page of search results, most absolutely guilt-free about offering the perfect bag of lawn treatment..
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Kentucky’s Secret Gardens  by  Allen Bush

Looking for inspiration and information? Catch a glimpse of Kentucky’s Secret Gardens. Author Tavia Cathcart Brown hosts the documentary, sponsored by Kentucky Education Television (KET). I was flattered to be included in a small piece of the first round of Kentucky’s Secret Gardens, and I enjoyed the show more than I had imagined. Videographer and Co-Producer Frank Simkonis shot some beautiful footage. The drone shots of the prairie are way cool. As soon as I walk into a garden I can tell if it is loved or not. I’m partial to gardens that are tended hands on. Passionate and committed gardeners have created vastly different Kentucky Secret Gardens. See for yourselves. I’ve never been to these Kentucky secret gardens. (Where have I been?) I’m ready to pack the car for a road trip to Woodford County, Lexington, Newport, Berea, Eubanks and Louisville. I’d love to visit them all. The program held my attention from beginning to end. Rose enjoyed it, too, but thought that, clocking in a ..
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Kentucky’s Secret Gardens

Looking for inspiration and information? Catch a glimpse of Kentucky’s Secret Gardens. Author Tavia Cathcart Brown hosts the documentary, sponsored by Kentucky Education Television (KET). I was flattered to be included in a small piece of the first round of Kentucky’s Secret Gardens, and I enjoyed the show more than I had imagined. Videographer and Co-Producer Frank Simkonis shot some beautiful footage. The drone shots of the prairie are way cool. As soon as I walk into a garden I can tell if it is loved or not. I’m partial to gardens that are tended hands on. Passionate and committed gardeners have created vastly different Kentucky Secret Gardens. See for yourselves. I’ve never been to these Kentucky secret gardens. (Where have I been?) I’m ready to pack the car for a road trip to Woodford County, Lexington, Newport, Berea, Eubanks and Louisville. I’d love to visit them all. The program held my attention from beginning to end. Rose enjoyed it, too, but thought that, clocking in a ..
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