Tin Chickens are the Right Garden Art for Us  by  Bob Hill

In the end it came down to a pair of ornamental tin chickens, both of them, no doubt, created in a distant and dangerous land soon to be confronting more tariffs – or less. So it goes in the modern yard-art department where, at some point, everything seems fair game or fowl. My taste in such in our Hidden Hill Nursery & Sculpture Garden has been running more toward tin chickens of late. That’s partly because every botanical garden and arboretum in the world has now been overrun with Chihuly and such. I do often enjoy those gardens’ massive fountains and carved limestone behemoths, but I do not rob banks or cajole the rich for a living. Some days you just have to settle for tin chickens. I started collecting garden art with even more modest goals. The nearby Ohio River provided limestone fossils from the Devonian era; anything that had been around more than 400 million years seemed like a worthwhile investment in time and dirty tennis shoes. Once there, driftwood also became fair g..
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Tin Chickens are the Right Garden Art for Us

In the end it came down to a pair of ornamental tin chickens, both of them, no doubt, created in a distant and dangerous land soon to be confronting more tariffs – or less. So it goes in the modern…Tin Chickens are the Right Garden Art for Us originally appeared on Garden Rant on June 25, 2018.
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12 Fast-Growing Shade Trees

Landscape Design 12 Fast-Growing Shade Trees By Sheereen Othman | June 25, 2018 Quaking Aspen Populus tremuloides If there were a Guinness Book of World Records for trees, the quaking aspen would be in it – several times. First, it has the widest natural range of any tree in North America, spanning 47 degrees of latitude (equal to half the distance from the equator to the North Pole), 110 degrees of longitude (nine time zones) and elevations from sea level to timberline. It is also the largest living organism, growing in clones that reproduce primarily by sending up sprouts from their roots. And as far as the oldest … a clone in Minnesota has been estimated to be thousands of years old! It is not a tree for all places. But planted in the right location, the quaking aspen is a delight of color, movement and sound. Zones 1-7 2. Northern Catalpa Catalpa speciosa This is a tree that demands your attention. White, showy flowers. Giant heart-shaped leaves. Dangling bean-like ..
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Time to “Rethink Pretty” in the Garden  by  Allen Bush

Benjamin Vogt and I began an email exchange last March after I read his very interesting A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion for an Uncertain Future. A few weeks ago, Benjamin had a sign posted on his property in Lincoln, Nebraska that warned him about the public nuisance he had created. He won the fight to keep his front and back yard prairie, but this got me thinking. It seemed like a good time to share our exchange. Portions have been edited and expanded. Onward Benjamin. I wrote my book to make folks as uncomfortable as I felt. I wrote it to question horticulture, landscape design, and all environmental movements. I wrote it to invigorate the discussion and get us to grapple with humanity in ways we avoid in order to protect ourselves from the reality of our lost love. I wrote it in order to unearth aspects of environmentalism I thought weren’t explored enough. I wrote my book out of depression, fear, and anger in order to discover a strength we all possess — the..
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I Saved the Old Junipers Despite your Advice  by  Susan Harris

In a post last fall I asked, “Can these Junipers be Saved?” about the old, overgrown ones used as foundation plants in front of my coop’s office building. Above, the very sad “before” look, showing a lot of dead parts due to shearing that was done to keep branches away from the sidewalks. It was the sadly common problem of using plants that become too large for their space. So the staff yanked out the junipers nearest the sidewalk, which revealed large dead areas on the remaining ones, where they’d been crowded and shaded. That’s when I asked GardenRant readers here and on Facebook to weigh in, which they sure did. The majority were in favor of removing ALL the old junipers: I would say just remove them and start fresh. Low growing evergreens like junipers tend to break or spread under a load of snow. So, when you remove the lower limbs, you’ve removed the support for the upper limbs making the juniper more prone to snow breakage. Besides, I personally am not a fan of the ornamental..
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I Saved the Old Junipers Despite your Advice

In a post last fall I asked, “Can these Junipers be Saved?” about the old, overgrown ones used as foundation plants in front of my coop’s office building. Above, the very sad “before” look, showing a lot of dead parts due to shearing that was done to keep branches away from the sidewalks. It was the sadly common problem of using plants that become too large for their space. So the staff yanked out the junipers nearest the sidewalk, which revealed large dead areas on the remaining ones, where they’d been crowded and shaded. That’s when I asked GardenRant readers here and on Facebook to weigh in, which they sure did. The majority were in favor of removing ALL the old junipers: I would say just remove them and start fresh. Low growing evergreens like junipers tend to break or spread under a load of snow. So, when you remove the lower limbs, you’ve removed the support for the upper limbs making the juniper more prone to snow breakage. Besides, I personally am not a fan of the ornamental..
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Too Cool For Color  by  Scott Beuerlein

I was never the “cool kid” when I was young. It just wasn’t an option for me. Oh, I tried. Tried everything I could think of, which, of course, only dug me in deeper. A fundamental rule of being cool? Don’t appear to be trying. Try to be cool too hard, and you get beat up, and I got beat up a lot. It didn’t help that I was relatively small, dorky, different, insecure, and maybe just a little bit obnoxious. Nope, being cool was never in the cards for me. Funny thing, although I admired those cool kids so much when I was young, wanted to be like them, and, above all, wanted to be liked by them, now, all these years later, I think of them as what they probably really were: jerks. Later on in life, I unexpectedly found myself a “cool kid.” Sort of. Became a serious plant geek. This, of course, is certainly not cool. Ask ten random people on the street if being a plant geek is cool, and you’ll see all of them make the same facial expressions you’d observe if you had exposed them to a real..
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Too Cool For Color

I was never the “cool kid” when I was young. It just wasn’t an option for me. Oh, I tried. Tried everything I could think of, which, of course, only dug me in deeper. A fundamental rule of being cool? Don’t appear to be trying. Try to be cool too hard, and you get beat up, and I got beat up a lot. It didn’t help that I was relatively small, dorky, different, insecure, and maybe just a little bit obnoxious. Nope, being cool was never in the cards for me. Funny thing, although I admired those cool kids so much when I was young, wanted to be like them, and, above all, wanted to be liked by them, now, all these years later, I think of them as what they probably really were: jerks. Later on in life, I unexpectedly found myself a “cool kid.” Sort of. Became a serious plant geek. This, of course, is certainly not cool. Ask ten random people on the street if being a plant geek is cool, and you’ll see all of them make the same facial expressions you’d observe if you had exposed them to a real..
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Liberating Design Ideas from Great Dixter

Great Dixter’s most famous view, by UK Garden Photos I jumped at the chance to hear Fergus Garrett, head gardener at Great Dixter – undoubtedly England’s most famous garden – when the Horticultural Society of Maryland brought him to Baltimore…Liberating Design Ideas from Great Dixter originally appeared on Garden Rant on April 27, 2018.
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These Animals are Disappearing from North American Forests

Featured Replanting Our National Forests These Animals are Disappearing from North American Forests By Sheereen Othman | June 19, 2018 Our forests are home to critical wildlife habitat. When our forests are threatened, it also threatens the homes of all the diverse wildlife habitat that live there. Natural disasters, urbanization, and agriculture are just a few of the common causes of deforestation. But as deforestation continues to rise, the animals that call it home start to disappear. These are just a few of the endangered and threatened animals disappearing as recorded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Jaguar Panthera once The jaguar is the second largest cat species in North America (after the cougar). Jaguar live in a range of habitats like forests and tropic forests, open terrains, swamps, and woodlands from Arizona and California to Louisiana and New Mexico. The jaguar also plays a key role in stabilizing ecosystems. Ocelot Leopardus pardalis Native to th..
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