Northern Catalpa: Rarely Unnoticed

Tree of the Week Northern Catalpa: Rarely Unnoticed By James R. Fazio | November 7, 2017 Catalpa speciosa Catalpa is a hard tree to overlook. Trumpet-shaped flowers herald its awakening for the summer and are soon followed by some of the largest leaves in the northern hemisphere. Elephant ears would not be too far off the mark for their description. Finally come the seed pods — bean-like in shape draping the tree like green tinsel. There are two key species of catalpa in the United States — southern and northern catalpa. Originally, southern catalpa was more widespread, but when the pioneers discovered the northern species in a very limited area of the Midwest, it didn’t take long to realize that this one grew larger and could tolerate colder winters better. Thanks to its fast growth and rot-resistant wood — and a promotional campaign by Nebraska governor Robert W. Furnas, a contemporary of J. Sterling Morton — farmers began planting it for fence posts and to sell as rai..
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Are Images of Gardeners in the Media Finally Improving? by Susan Harris

Gardeners in the play “Native Gardens” My recent rant about stereotypes of gardeners in a new play got me thinking about the images of gardeners used in advertising and elsewhere. The garden-club-competing gardeners in the play typify the demographic so often used to portray us – white and elderly. More of the same can be found by searching “gardener” at istockphoto, where these images of older women especially bug me because they convey the surprising (to all real gardeners) impression that gardening is about fussing over flowers. You and I know that gardening requires hard work – digging, hauling, and wrestling branches with pruning tools. Thankfully, iStock’s offerings include more diversity than just older white women. On Google image there are plenty of young people and quite a bit of pruning going on. Searching “gardener” on Shutterstock yields mostly super-fake images of gardens and just a few actual people, most of them young. Pexel’s gardener images are even stranger, st..
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