Bulb-Planting Rules I Break by Susan Harris

Who doesn’t love spring-blooming bulbs? I love all of them (well, except for hyacinths) and used to plant a large assortment every fall. Above are shots from my former garden, where I planted tulips, yanked them out after the blooms faded and had the fun of trying new ones in the same spot the next year. But no more. Now I ONLY plant bulbs that come back year after year and aren’t eaten by squirrels or deer. (Hooray for daffodils!) And I’ve entirely changed how I arrange them and plant them. I’m embarrassed to admit this, but when I was a gardening newbie I planted a couple hundred full-sized daffodils (my fave was Ice Follies), one bulb per hole and spaced evenly throughout the garden. It looked ridiculous. So over the years I gradually rearranged them into clumps, masses and sweeps – which we all know look better than one-offs. Planting bulbs too close together And I gradually switched to planting bunches of 5-10 bulbs in each hole because I like the look and it’s SO much easier ..
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This Cyber Monday Shop The Arbor Day Foundation For Free Shipping

Arbor Day Coffee Misc Rain Forest Rescue Replanting Our National Forests This Cyber Monday Shop The Arbor Day Foundation For Free Shipping By Brianne Bayer | November 23, 2017 Cyber Monday is a great day! Why is it great, you ask? I’ll tell you! It is the one day out of the entire year you can sit in the comfort of your chair, sip your cup of coffee, and have great deal after great deal available right at your fingertips. Ten years ago the Monday after Thanksgiving was coined as “Cyber Monday” – in short, Cyber Monday is like Black Friday but you get to avoid all the crowds and cold weather and shop from the comfort of your computer. I don’t know about you, but that sounds like a great day to me. The Arbor Day Foundation has unique holiday gift options that give back. We offer Earth-friendly gifts for everyone on your list. Whether it’s tree planting in honor of a loved one, rain forest-saving coffee and chocolate, or an individually packaged evergreen, a gift from the Ar..
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Goodbye, and thanks for your service by Elizabeth Licata

In (somewhat) better days Trees are suffering. First, there are the pests; among the most current are the emerald ash borer, the mountain pine beetle, and the wooly aldegid. Then there are the ravages of fires, hurricanes, and other natural disasters; it was awful to see the defoliation in the Caribbean earlier this year (though growing conditions there should promote faster replacement than we’d see in Buffalo). And then there are the always-ongoing threats of bad planting and bad maintenance. One of only two trees on our actual property—we are surrounded by trees we don’t own—was just cut down last week, the last in a series of must-do pre-winter tasks. A big sugar maple, it had been weakening over the past five years, and now posed a serious threat to neighboring structures. We think it’s many decades old, but aren’t sure of the exact age. During garden tours, visitors have always been surprised to be seeing such a large tree in an urban courtyard garden; it grew directly against ..
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Littleleaf Linden: Tree with a Past

Tree of the Week Littleleaf Linden: Tree with a Past By James R. Fazio | November 21, 2017 Tilia cordata Few of our street trees have a heritage as rich as the littleleaf linden. We enjoy this transplant from Europe for its pleasing shape, dense canopy, and super-fragrant flowers, but to the ancients it was much more. Littleleaf linden is one of some 30 species of lindens native to the northern hemisphere, including our native forest tree, basswood. In Europe, littleleaf dominated the woodlands of England after the Ice Age and today it is the linden that stretches farthest north into Scandinavia. This was such a valued tree that there is evidence of it being planted and used for social purposes as early as 760 A.D. The special qualities of littleleaf and its kin evoke things romantic. Youths and maidens are said to have “danced wildly” around the village lindens. This probably was because in the Germanic and Norse countries, at least, the tree was special to Freya, the g..
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Video: Best-Performing Native Plants in my Garden by Susan Harris

These days we’re all paying more attention to beneficial wildlife in our gardens, and to that end, looking for good native plants to grow. But which ones? Those official lists of state or regional natives don’t really help the aspiring eco-gardener make their choices. So many of the listed plants aren’t even in the trade! Instead, I always recommend asking experienced gardeners. Gardeners like me, for instance. In this short video I gush about the 10 best-performing native plants I’ve ever grown, and by that I mean they look great and are easy-care. No fertilizers or fungicides needed. And except for the Oakleaf Hydrangea, no regular watering after the plants are established. They are: Black-Eyed Susans, Coreopsis, Purple Coneflower, Spiderwort, Joe Pye Weed, Golden Groundsel, Amsonia, Oakleaf Hydrangea, Crossvine, and Redbud. And in the video description on YouTube I add three “bonus plants” that aren’t in the video for lack of decent photos of them: Ninebark, Penstemon and Little B..
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What is Agroforestry and why Does It Matter?

Arbor Day Coffee What is Agroforestry and why Does It Matter? By Jon Ferguson | November 13, 2017 Arbor Day Coffee is grown by farmers who are committed to using sustainable agroforestry management practices on their farm. Agroforestry is a land use management system where trees or shrubs are grown around crops or pastureland. We call it the shade-grown difference. This shade-grown practice of harvesting coffee leads to healthier crops and has a positive environmental impact. In some cases, it can also be more cost effective than farms with sophisticated technology and chemical treatments. Agroforestry has its advantages. For example, planting a diverse selection of tree species — like fruit trees — empowers smallholder coffee farmers to grow nutritional food sources, making them less dependent on a single crop. Additionally, there are numerous environmental benefits. Trees add nutrients to the soil, provide shade to crops, and add an aesthetic value to the property. Th..
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Can these Junipers be Saved? by Susan Harris

My latest gardening obsession is making over the landscape in front of my housing co-op offices, where the top priority is to do something about the overgrown junipers. Planted too close to the sidewalk and doors, they’d been sheared back, which caused much unsightly needle-browning. The problem wasn’t just that they were encroaching onto sidewalks, either. Their looming presence over the doors made the female staffers feel less than safe as they exited, especially at night. Something had to be done, and right away. So the team of staff and volunteers working on this decided to have the junipers closest to the sidewalk removed, and it was super-gratifying to watch those bad boys being yanked out of the ground by a Bobcat excavator. Unfortunately, this exposed even more dieback and browning in the adjacent junipers (above). So ugly. But man, I live for pruning projects like this! Oh, the mountain of dead juniper branches I gleefully (obsessively) compiled, ignoring the dozen or so c..
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How to Create a Garden Around Your Home That Stands Out

Landscape Design How to Create a Garden Around Your Home That Stands Out By Arbor Day Foundation | November 10, 2017 Guest Post by Mike Andrews, My Door Pro. Whether you just moved into a new home with a large lawn or recently sparked an interest in gardening, this article is for you. Sure, you can always ask your neighbors how they did it in their lawns, but as usual, you want to stand out from the crowd. You want your garden to be as attractive and as colorful as possible without the high cost. Thinking of transforming your garden? These tips are for you ¾ everything you need to know about gardening is listed here ¾ eliminating the need to hire professional help. Ensure you have a weed-free garden This is the first rule whenever you want to beautify your garden. Before anything else, ensure that you can rid your garden of weeds. You can get a wheeled stool to do the job. If you want to replant in place of the weeds, you can go for sweet alyssum (Loburia Maritima) o..
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10 Most Popular Nursery Trees and Shrubs Shipping This Fall

Tree Planting 10 Most Popular Nursery Trees and Shrubs Shipping This Fall By Sheereen Othman | November 8, 2017 Arbor Day fall shipping started this week, which means your new trees will be arriving soon and ready to plant. Thousands of trees will be shipped from the Arbor Day nursery. Here are the 10 most popular Arbor Day nursery trees finding their new homes. Green Giant Arborvitae Thuja standishii x plicata ‘Green Giant’ The green giant arborvitae is a large, vigorous, fast-growing evergreen—shooting up by as much as 3′ per year until maturity. Its natural pyramidal to conical form boasts dense, rich green foliage that darkens or bronzes slightly in the winter. This is an exceptional landscape tree for use as a screen, hedge or single specimen. It is also resistant to wind once established and can withstand heavy ice or snow, making it a good choice for a natural windbreak. 2. American Arborvitae Thuja occidentalis This native evergreen is a hard-working, versatile..
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A Glimpse of a Lunatic’s Garden by Allen Bush

Jamie Dockery, wizard of farm and garden. August 12, 2017. I don’t know anyone on this planet, or galaxy, with more runaway enthusiasm for gardening than Jamie Dockery. And that’s not all. Besides his rabid determination to grow anything with chlorophyll, Jamie also raises little cows, little goats, chickens, ducks, donkeys, and tends an aviary with finches and canaries—all of this on his ten-acre farm in Salvisa, KY, not far from the Kentucky River. Ansel, the newborn, black and white calf. March 26, 2017. “I’m a full blown nut job,” Jamie confessed during a lecture he gave early last spring called: “A Glimpse of a Lunatic’s Garden.” This was one of nearly 50 talks Jamie presents each year as part of his day job as the Fayette County Extension Agent for Horticulture Education. Jamie’s first love, after his livestock, is perennials, but he is no one-trick pony. He’s extremely knowledgeable on trees, shrubs, and fruits and vegetables, too. The little cows in early May. Jamie trial..
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